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Monday, 17 October 2016 07:55

X - Jack

Written by Jerry DuPree
X Jack inflating X Jack inflating Jerry DuPree

X-Jack

by Jerry Dupree

Always something new. This is another product we learned about from our visit to Australia. There are various reasons to carry different types of jacks. One may work in some situations but totally worthless in others. The best thing you can do with the jack that came with your vehicle is to throw it away and get a hydraulic floor jack. Always bring a couple of scraps of 1/2” or 3/4” plywood to use in mud or sand. Floor jacks are cheap, small enough to carry anywhere, easier to use, and much safer. I have a high lift jack and a floor jack, and now an Exhaust Jack.

It operates by connecting to the exhaust pipe of your vehicle and has a 6,000 lb. capacity. It is larger than a large pizza and weighs about 20 lbs. Just unzip the carrying case and place it under the vehicle in a position where it will reliably support the vehicle. That could be the frame, axle where it connects to the spring, or under a differential. Connect the hose to the exhaust pipe and start the engine. As with any jack there are precautions about getting under a vehicle without jack stands. Just don’t do it. As with any jack, always place blocks under the wheels to prevent the vehicle from rolling off of the jack.

We “field tested” the X-Jack in desert terrain. We took it out of its cover and thoroughly read the instructions, then carefully positioned it and connected everything. Did it work? Well sorta, but not as expected. It is simple, but too many parts that could get lost at night or fall in the sand. The hose comes in two pieces depending on whether you are lifting the front or the rear. It is supposed to lift 6,000 lbs, which is more than the weight of my truck, or at least half of it. It did lift one wheel, but not enough to clear the ground and would require building up the jack position or digging under the tire to change it or plan to extricate where a vehicle might be stuck. It would take more than one person to operate the jack; one to hold the hose adapter to the exhaust pipe and the other to start the vehicle. A third person would help to hold the position of the jack while it inflates. It might get mushy on uneven or sloping terrain and tend to roll. The jack comes with a rubber mat to protect it from sharp objects on the ground. I placed a piece of plywood on top of the inflatable bag to protect the top of it.

Would I recommend it or buy it again? No, there are more reliable jacks that are cheaper and easier to set up, operate, and put away. I recommend a high lift and a hydraulic floor jack.

~ Jerry

Last modified on Monday, 17 October 2016 23:53
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