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Books & Reviews (5)

The Desert Explorers are a refined and intelligent group. Interests vary and most of us are bookworms to some extent. This section contains book reviews as well as places to find and enjoy books related to the desert and our environment. Happy reading!

Monday, 03 October 2016 23:55

The Silence and the Sun

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Book Review
The Silence and The Sun (Second Edition) by Joe de Kehoe 340pp

By Neal Johns, Chairman Emeritus, Desert Explorers

The Silence and The Sun covers the history of over 4,000 square miles of the East Mojave Desert with an emphasis on the people that lived there and their interactions with the rugged environment they lived in and changed. Joe has another winner; the First Edi- tion was outstanding for what it covered and now the Second Edition has added about 60 pages of mostly new material with a few minor corrections.

One of my first excursions into the East Mojave in the 1970’s was to drive over the Skeleton Pass Road. How could anyone resist a name like that? This was followed by many hundreds of miles of driving in the East Mojave and having no idea of the history around me until I began to read many of the desert history books. With the publication of this book, anyone like me will be saved from that fate. It is the best introduction to the history of an area I have seen.

The history of the Skeleton Pass Road is just one of the many things covered. The new material includes a great chapter on the Old Woman Meteorite and how it was taken from the two prospectors that found it, the Bagdad airfield, the “Cornfield Meet” – (Railroad slang for a collision) – between a train and a Army tank and other new added chapters.

Abandoned shacks, now falling down have a history and the broken dreams or successes of their long-gone owners are told here. Directions and GPS coordinates are given for explorers along with many old maps that show what once was. Above all, this is the story of the people that lived and worked in mines, on the railroad, and on or around Route 66. Imagine being a first grader and having to walk six and one half miles (one way!) to school, five days a week, or living in a tent while starting a gar- age on the new Route 66.

This book is highly recommended for anyone interested in any phase of the desert. No dull history tome, this book comes alive with the people that made the desert their home and their accomplishments.

Kenneth Brown opens his book like so many desert writers before him, with a rapturous description of an unnamed canyon in Canyonlands, running through the colors of the rainbow and his repertoire of synonyms for "dry" and "rocky." Ho hum. But the book improves considerably from there, exploring the geology, biology, and history of the area in enough detail to be interesting but not so much as to be daunting. He divides the area into quarters, explores the geology and life forms of specific locales at each of the four points of the compass and then returns to the center, managing within this structure to unfold a chronological account of the area's human history as well.

Sunday, 17 November 2013 12:05

Cave Paintings of Baja California

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Mr. Harry Crosby's beautiful book, The Cave Paintings of Baja California is available now from the Mojave River Valley Museum. This outstanding coffee-table-quality book had been out of print for several years before being revised and republished in 1997. Original editions sell for more than $100 per copy – when you can find them. This new revised edition contains new color plates and is truly a delight. The dustcover has this to say: "This full-color account, revised and expanded from the orignal edition, depicts the author's discovery and documentation of a world-class archaeological region in the remote central Baja California. The paintings were unveiled to the modern world in the 1960s by adventure writer Erle Stanley Gardner in conjunction with a comprehensive study by Dr. Clement Meighan of UCLA. These Great Murals, whose origins remain mysterious to this day, rank with those of southern France, northern Spain, northwest Africa, and outback Australia."

Our own Bill Mann, of Barstow Museum fame, has published his new book, Guide to 50 Interesting and Mysterious Sites in the Mojave. In 8-1/2" x 11" format, this 90-page book contains 139 color photographs of the some of the Mojave Desert's most interesting and mysterious sites. The book includes detailed travel directions for each site. All sites are cross-referenced to the DeLorme Atlas & Gazeteer with GPS coordinates. Don't miss this wonderful book by "one of our own." A great buy for just $20.00 per copy.

Sunday, 17 November 2013 11:53

Windshield Adventuring?

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Windshield Adventuring sounds like a good phrase to me! Too bad Barstow Mojave River Valley Museum members Russell and Kathlynn Spencer invented it. They even write books using that title. Tired of sitting around weekends when no one else is going out to see the sights? Have we got a deal for you! The Spencer’s have traveled extensively alone in a stock Cherokee and written guidebooks to the exciting places found so we can share with them. Sounds kind of touchy feely doesn't it? Guess I am getting old, and it shows in my writing. Living with Marian will do that to a man, Ha!